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Accessibility Checklists

Improving your services

Considering these items for your business can open up plenty of opportunities, not just for you, but for your customers and community too.

  1. Emergency Preparedness
  2. Communication & Advertising
  3. Exterior of Building
  4. Interior of Building
  5. Public Washrooms
  6. Bed & Breakfasts
  7. Hotels & Motels
  8. Restaurants
  9. Retail

With respect to your businesses' emergency preparedness, have you considered:

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  • visual and audible signals for your fire alarms and safety routes?
  • ensuring people using mobility aids can use the main exit routes and doors in case of emergency?
  • ensuring that a fire policy and safety plan are developed, and taught to all staff, for evacuating people with disabilities?
  • offering emergency information in alternate formats, such as large print, Braille, audio file, or electronic text?

Sources

  1. "Recruit Ability...A handbook for success in recruitment & hiring individuals with disabilities", Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership Network of Nova Scotia
  2. Government of Ontario, "Making buildings and spaces accessible", from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/making_buildings_accessible.aspx
  3. Vision Hotels UK, from http://www.visionhotels.co.uk/top-tips-for-helping-blind-people-in-hotels/

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In your communication and advertising, have you ever considered:

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  • training staff in effective customer service for people with disabilities?
  • offering assistance to customers with disabilities?
  • accepting reservations through multiple formats, such as a number that has texting capacity, your website, or company e-mail?
  • using e-mail, texting, the 711 relay system, or instant messaging to contact deaf clients?
  • making your website fully accessible?
  • listing your accessibility features, in detail with pictures, on ads/sites?

Sources

  1. "Recruit Ability... A handbook for success in recruitment & hiring individuals with disabilities", Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership Network of Nova Scotia
  2. Government of Ontario, "Making buildings and spaces accessible", from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/making_buildings_accessible.aspx
  3. Vision Hotels UK, from http://www.visionhotels.co.uk/top-tips-for-helping-blind-people-in-hotels/

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In regards to the exterior of your building, have you considered:

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  • keeping your parking areas and the outside of the building brightly lit for good visibility?
  • having access from the parking area to the main entrance that is level or has a curb cut?
  • making at least one of your parking places, close to a wheelchair accessible entrance, an accessible blue zone spot?
  • an accessible drop-off/pick-up area, close to an accessible entrance?
  • continuous handrails on both sides of steps, in and out of the building?
  • marking steps with a non-slip, contrasting colour tape (light on dark or dark on light) on the outer edge of each step, in and out of the building?
  • putting a ramp, with contrasting colour handrails, in your entrance?
  • marking ramps with a non-slip, contrasting colour tape?
  • keeping your ramp free from obstructions, including snow and ice?
  • clearly marking accessible entrances with the international symbol of accessibility or signage indicating the nearest accessible entrance?
  • having clearly visible, outside signs with large text and recognizable symbols to identify your business?
  • painting your entrance door with a contrasting colour to its surroundings?
  • using signs or tape to mark any glass in doors, windbreaks, or window and floor displays?
  • wide door frames on all doors for people using mobility aids?
  • push button, automatic door openers for all doorways?
  • having door hinges on a low tension so they are easy to open?
  • putting lever handles at an accessible height on all doors?

Sources

  1. "Recruit Ability... A handbook for success in recruitment & hiring individuals with disabilities", Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership Network of Nova Scotia
  2. Government of Ontario, "Making buildings and spaces accessible", from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/making_buildings_accessible.aspx
  3. Vision Hotels UK, from http://www.visionhotels.co.uk/top-tips-for-helping-blind-people-in-hotels/

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In regards to the interior of your building, have you considered:

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  • push button, automatic door openers for all doorways?
  • wide door frames on all doors for people using mobility aids?
  • putting lever handles at an accessible height on all doors?
  • keeping music at a low volume and reducing background noise?
  • having all reception desks at a sitting height with an available chair?
  • a debit machine with raised, tactile symbols that can extend out or tilt down for people at lower heights?
  • maintaining a scent-free environment throughout your building?
  • keeping the building brightly lit for good visibility?
  • non-slip, non-glare flooring, but no carpet, throughout your building?
  • having all doors, walls, and floors in contrasting colours to each other?
  • keeping your corridors free from obstructions?
  • having door hinges on a low tension, so they are easy to open?
  • putting lever handles at an accessible height on all doors?
  • big meeting rooms with wide spaces around all furniture?
  • installing an elevator with Braille buttons and raised numerals?
  • installing audible signals, like a beep or recording for each floor, and visual cues to announce the floor and direction of your elevator?
  • having elevator doors that reverse direction, if they meet an obstacle?
  • all telephones being at an easy level for people using mobility aids?
  • volume control and large numbers or large print keypads on all telephones?

Sources

  1. "Recruit Ability... A handbook for success in recruitment & hiring individuals with disabilities", Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership Network of Nova Scotia
  2. Government of Ontario, "Making buildings and spaces accessible", from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/making_buildings_accessible.aspx
  3. Vision Hotels UK, from http://www.visionhotels.co.uk/top-tips-for-helping-blind-people-in-hotels/

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In regards to the public washrooms in your building, have you considered:      Download PDF

  • grab bars in your bathrooms for the toilets?
  • adequate space beside toilets for lateral transfer from mobility aids?
  • adequate knee space under sinks for people using mobility aids?
  • placing your soap dispensers, paper towel holders, and mirrors at a height that will allow easy access for people using mobility aids?
  • having a raised (tactile) male or female sign on public bathrooms?
  • having at least one public washroom that is fully accessible for people using mobility devices, marked with the international symbol for accessibility?
  • a "D" style handle on both sides of the bathroom cubicle door?

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For your Bed & Breakfast, have you considered:

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  • wide door frames on some doors (entrance; accessible room; bathroom; kitchen) for people using mobility aids?
  • accepting reservations through multiple formats, such as a number that has texting capacity, your website, or company e-mail?
  • using e-mail, texting, the 711 relay system, or instant messaging to contact deaf clients?
  • having your reception desk at a sitting height with an available chair?
  • a debit machine with raised, tactile symbols that can extend out or tilt down for people at lower heights?
  • keeping wide, clear accessible routes from the entrance to all rooms?
  • having at least one washroom that is fully accessible for people using mobility devices, marked with the International symbol?
  • space in the kitchen and common areas for people using mobility aids to move comfortably around furniture?
  • a kitchen table that allows people using mobility aids to fit underneath?
  • cutlery with large, non-slip handles?
  • offering breakfast menus and the guest information provided in rooms, such as use of the telephone, in alternate formats, including large print, Braille, audio file, or electronic text?
  • offering assistance filling out breakfast menus, if required?
  • having at least one designated guest room that is fully accessible on the main floor, close to an accessible bathroom?
  • space for people using mobility aids to maneuver around the room?
  • having room numbers/names in Braille or raised numbers/text?
  • having a door knocker with a flashing light?
  • having a light that flashes when the telephone rings?
  • adequate space beside the bed for lateral transfer from mobility aids?
  • lower bed height for easy lateral transfer from mobility aids?
  • adequate knee space under desks for people using mobility aids?
  • having thermostats, light switches, lamps, and closet racks at a height that is accessible for people using mobility aids?
  • placing microwaves at a height that can be easily accessed by all?
  • braille or raised numbers on your microwave buttons?
  • lever handles on all your sink faucets?
  • grab bars in your bathrooms for toilets and bathtub/shower areas?
  • having a roll-in shower with level access, a fold down shower bench, and height adjustable, hand-held shower head?
  • adequate space beside toilets for lateral transfer from mobility aids?
  • adequate knee space under sinks for people using mobility aids?
  • placing your soap dispensers, paper towel holders, and mirrors at a height that will allow easy access for people using mobility aids?

Sources

  1. "Recruit Ability... A handbook for success in recruitment & hiring individuals with disabilities", Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership Network of Nova Scotia
  2. Government of Ontario, "Making buildings and spaces accessible", from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/making_buildings_accessible.aspx
  3. Vision Hotels UK, from http://www.visionhotels.co.uk/top-tips-for-helping-blind-people-in-hotels/

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For your hotel or motel, have you considered:

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  • offering assistance to customers with disabilities?
  • having at least one public washroom that is fully accessible for people using mobility devices, marked with the international symbol?
  • offering breakfast menus and the guest information provided in rooms, such as use of the telephone, in alternate formats, including large print, Braille, audio file, or electronic text?
  • offering assistance filling out breakfast menus, if required?
  • having at least one designated guest room that is fully accessible, which has all the features of an accessible room listed below?
  • ensuring there is adequate space for people using mobility aids to maneuver within all the guest rooms?
  • having room numbers in Braille or raised numbers?
  • having door knockers with a flashing light?
  • having a light that flashes when the telephone rings?
  • placing telephones at an easy level for people using mobility aids?
  • volume control and large numbers or large print keypads on all telephones?
  • adequate space beside beds for lateral transfer from mobility aids?
  • lowered bed height for easy lateral transfer from mobility aids?
  • adequate knee space under desks for people using wheelchairs?
  • having thermostats, light switches, lamps, peepholes, and closet racks at a height that is accessible for people using mobility aids?
  • placing microwaves at a height that can be easily accessed by people using mobility aids?
  • having Braille or raised numbers on your microwave buttons?
  • having lever handles on all your sink faucets?
  • grab bars in your bathrooms for toilets and bathtub/shower areas?
  • having a roll-in shower with level access, a fold-down shower bench, and a height adjustable, hand held shower head?
  • adequate space beside toilets for lateral transfer from mobility aids?
  • adequate knee space under sinks for people using mobility aids?
  • placing your soap dispensers, paper towel holders, and mirrors at a height that will allow easy access for people using mobility aids?
  • accepting reservations through multiple formats, such as a number that has texting capacity, your website, or company e-mail?
  • using e-mail, texting, the 711 relay system, or instant messaging to contact deaf clients?
  • a debit machine with raised, tactile symbols that can extend out or tilt down for people at lower heights?
  • also, please consult the accessibility checklist on restaurants, if this applies to your business.

Sources

  1. "Recruit Ability... A handbook for success in recruitment & hiring individuals with disabilities", Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership Network of Nova Scotia
  2. Government of Ontario, "Making buildings and spaces accessible", from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/making_buildings_accessible.aspx
  3. Vision Hotels UK, from http://www.visionhotels.co.uk/top-tips-for-helping-blind-people-in-hotels/

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For your restaurant, have you considered:

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  • offering assistance to customers with disabilities?
  • having an easily noticeable, large print sign to notify customers that they need to wait to be seated by staff?
  • keeping several chairs in the wait area for customers who need to sit?
  • having some coat racks or coat counters at a lower height?
  • offering menus, in alternate formats, such as large print, Braille, audio file, or electronic text?
  • accepting reservations through multiple formats, such as a number that has texting capacity, your website, or company e-mail?
  • using e-mail, texting, the 711 relay system, or instant messaging to contact deaf clients?
  • keeping a wide, clear, accessible route to a lowered cashier desk?
  • a debit machine with raised, tactile symbols that can extend out or tilt down for people at lower heights?
  • having at least one washroom that is fully accessible for people using mobility devices, marked with the international symbol?
  • having continuous tray rails at a height for people using mobility aids?
  • having self-serve counters and condiment stations at a lower height?
  • adequate knee space under tables and removable chairs for people using mobility aids?
  • adequate space around furniture and posts for people using mobility aids to easily maneuver around the restaurant?
  • food displays that are easily seen and reached from a lower height?
  • having cutlery with large, non-slip handles?

Sources

  1. Greater Toronto Hotel Association- Hospitality Checklists – Checklist section C Amenity & Recreation at: http://www.gtha.com/GovernmentRelations/LegislativeUpdates/Accessibility/HospitalityCheckList.aspx
  2. Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas, “Missed Business” Booklet at: http://toronto-bia.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=21&Itemid=71
  3. Vision Hotels UK, from http://www.visionhotels.co.uk/top-tips-for-helping-blind-people-in-hotels/
  4. "Recruit Ability... A handbook for success in recruitment & hiring individuals with disabilities", Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership Network of Nova Scotia
  5. Government of Ontario, "Making buildings and spaces accessible", from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/making_buildings_accessible.aspx

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For your retail business, have you considered:

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  • offering assistance to customers with disabilities?
  • accepting inquiries through multiple formats, such as a number that has texting capacity, your website, or company e-mail?
  • using e-mail, texting, the 711 relay system, or instant messaging to contact deaf clients?
  • having a straight-backed chair, without arms, for people to rest?
  • keeping a wide, clear, accessible route to a lowered service desk?
  • a checkout aisle wide enough for people using mobility aids?
  • having at least one washroom that is fully accessible for people using mobility devices, marked with the international symbol?
  • a debit machine with raised, tactile symbols that can extend out or tilt down for people at lower heights?
  • putting pricing labels/signs in large, colour contrasting print?
  • offering contracts, where applicable, in alternate formats, such as large print, Braille, audio file, or electronic text?
  • keeping your aisles and corridors free from obstructions, including products, displays, and shipments?
  • ensuring there is adequate space around displays for people using mobility aids to easily move through aisles and around the store?

Sources

  1. Government of Ontario, Ministry of Community and Social Services, How-to videos on accessibility, "Talk to Me - Serving Customers with Disabilities" at http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/howto_videos.aspx
  2. Toronto Association of Business Improvement Areas, “Missed Business” Booklet at: http://toronto-bia.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=21&Itemid=71
  3. Greater Toronto Hotel Association- Hospitality Checklists – Checklist section C Amenity & Recreation at: http://www.gtha.com/GovernmentRelations/LegislativeUpdates/Accessibility/HospitalityCheckList.aspx
  4. Vision Hotels UK, from http://www.visionhotels.co.uk/top-tips-for-helping-blind-people-in-hotels/
  5. "Recruit Ability...A handbook for success in recruitment & hiring individuals with disabilities", Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership Network of Nova Scotia; and Government of Ontario, “Making buildings and spaces accessible”, from http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/understanding_accessibility/making_buildings_accessible.aspx

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